Exhibitions - Instytut Pileckiego

Liberated Twice. The political rights of women 1918

The exhibition shows the role played by the Polish Government-in-Exile and the Polish Underground State in informing the world about the Holocaust, and in activities undertaken to save Jews on territories occupied by Nazi Germany.

It was organized in connection with research conducted by the Polish Embassy in Switzerland and the Pilecki Institute, which resulted in the publication of a list of persons of Jewish origin who thanks to the efforts of the so-called Ładoś Group received passports of various Latin American countries. Many of them owed their lives to these documents. The exposition is an exhaustive presentation of the activities of the Ładoś Group and its leading figures, chief among them Chaim Eiss and Aleksander Ładoś. The artefacts include some of the original passports and correspondence between Chaim Eiss and Polish diplomats. Letters sent by Jews detained in ghettos and by Abraham Silberschein, who was one of the intermediaries in contacts between Polish Jews and the Legation, are also on display.

The Volunteer. Witold Pilecki and his Mission in Auschwitz

Presentation of the story hitherto unknown and untold outside Poland – that of Pilecki’s mission to Auschwitz, of his death at the hands of the Communist authorities, and of the attempts made to erase him from memory.

The complicated history of Poland in the 20th century is made up not only of military campaigns, the German occupation, and the crimes of Stalinism. History has many dimensions, and one of them is predominantly human – the dimension of the individual. From amongst many heroes, oftentimes nameless, the man who stands out as a symbol of the struggle against Communist and Nazi totalitarianism is worthy of our particular attention. Logically, therefore, there was no doubt that the exhibition marking the opening of the branch of the Pilecki Institute in Berlin would be devoted to Witold Pilecki.

Lemkin. Witness to the Age of Genocide

On 9 December 1948, the United Nations unanimously adopted the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. Thus, genocide was officially recognized as a crime under international law. Among those present in the Palace de Chaillot in Paris was the creator of the concept of “genocide” and the author of the draft of the Convention, Rafał Lemkin – a Polish lawyer of Jewish origin.

“Lemkin. Witness to the Age of Genocide” is the title of the first-ever exhibition in Poland, organized by the Pilecki Institute, to be devoted entirely to the person of Rafał Lemkin. Its opening coincided with the 70th anniversary of the adoption of the Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, which Lemkin considered as his life’s work. Warsaw, the city where he had had his legal practice and from which he fled before the advancing German forces in September 1939, suffered heavily from German crimes – the victims of which included both Jews and Poles – throughout the War, and this makes it a fitting location to speak about the life and achievements of Rafał Lemkin.

Passports

The exhibition shows the role played by the Polish Government-in-Exile and the Polish Underground State in informing the world about the Holocaust, and in activities undertaken to save Jews on territories occupied by Nazi Germany.

It was organized in connection with research conducted by the Polish Embassy in Switzerland and the Pilecki Institute, which resulted in the publication of a list of persons of Jewish origin who thanks to the efforts of the so-called Ładoś Group received passports of various Latin American countries. Many of them owed their lives to these documents. The exposition is an exhaustive presentation of the activities of the Ładoś Group and its leading figures, chief among them Chaim Eiss and Aleksander Ładoś. The artefacts include some of the original passports and correspondence between Chaim Eiss and Polish diplomats. Letters sent by Jews detained in ghettos and by Abraham Silberschein, who was one of the intermediaries in contacts between Polish Jews and the Legation, are also on display.

Called by Name

“Called by Name” is a project devoted to persons of Polish nationality who were murdered for providing help to Jews during the German occupation.

The debate about how to commemorate the victims of the Second World War has been ongoing for years in Poland and other European countries. But there was no project that allowed us to commemorate those Poles who had been murdered for hiding their Jewish neighbors. That was the inspiration for the Pilecki Institute's “Called by Name” exhibition.